Sunday, October 2, 2022

TheList 6234

The List 6234     TGB

To All,

Good Sunday morning October 2..
Regards,
skip


Today in Naval and Marine Corps History

October 2
Today in Naval and Marine Corps History

October 2

Today in Naval History
October 2
1799 The Washington Navy Yard is established under the direction of Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Stoddert and supervision of Commodore Thomas Tingey.
1863 USS Bermuda seizes the blockade-running English schooner Florie near Matagorda, Texas, with a cargo of medicine, wine and saddles much needed by the Confederate cavalry.
1918 A squadron of 11 American submarine chasers screen British-French-Italian naval forces during the Second Battle of Durazzo, destroying mines and driving off an Austrian submarine trying to reach the fleet.
1939 The Act of Panama is approved by the ministers of the American Republics at Panama City, Panama. The act establishes a neutral zone 300 miles to seaward from the continental coastline that is patrolled by the U.S. Navy.
1943 A mine laid by USS Silversides (SS 236) four months earlier damages Imperial Japanese Navy minesweeper W 28 off Kavieng Bay, New Ireland, Bismarck.
1944 USS Pomfret (SS 391) attacks a Japanese convoy in Luzon Strait, sinking an army transport about 75 miles southeast of the southern tip of Formosa.
1952 USS Marsh (DE 699) and HMCS Iroquois (DDE 217) undergo fire by shore batteries in the vicinity of Songin, South Korea. Marsh escapes without damage but Iroquois receives one direct hit and one airburst, killing three men and wounding 10. Both ships replied with counter-battery fire, silencing the enemy shore batteries.



Today in History
October 2   
1263        At Largs, King Alexander III of Scotland repels an amphibious invasion by King Haakon IV of Norway.
1535        Having landed in Quebec a month ago, Jacques Cartier reaches a town, which he names Montreal.
1862        An Army under Union General Joseph Hooker arrives in Bridgeport, Alabama to support the Union forces at Chattanooga. Chattanooga's Lookout Mountain provides a dramatic setting for the Civil War's battle above the clouds.
1870        The papal states vote in favor of union with Italy. The capital is moved from Florence to Rome.
1871        Morman leader Brigham Young, 70, is arrested for polygamy. He was later convicted, but the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction.
1879        A dual alliance is formed between Austria and Germany, in which the two countries agree to come to the other's aid in the event of aggression.
1909        Orville Wright sets an altitude record, flying at 1,600 feet. This exceeded Hubert Latham's previous record of 508 feet.
1931        Aerial circus star Clyde Pangborn and playboy Hugh Herndon, Jr. set off to complete the first nonstop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Misawa City, Japan.
1941        The German army launches Operation Typhoon, the drive towards Moscow.
1950        The comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schultz, makes its first appearance in newspapers.
1959        The groundbreaking TV series The Twilight Zone, hosted by Rod Serling, premiers on CBS.
1964        Scientists announce findings that smoking can cause cancer.
1967        Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American Supreme Court justice, is sworn in. Marshall had previously been the solicitor general, the head of the legal staff of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and a leading American civil rights lawyer.
1970        A plane carrying the Wichita State University football team, staff, and supporters crashes in Colorado; 31 of the 40 people aboard die.
1980        Congressional Representative Mike Myers is expelled from the US House for taking a bribe in the Abscam scandal, the first member to be expelled since 1861.
1990        Flight 8301 of China's Xiamen Airlines is hijacked and crashed into Baiyun International Airport, hitting two other aircraft and killing 128 people.
2001        NATO backs US military strikes in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks.
           

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

From the List Archives

Bug Roach
Today is the 30th anniversary of loss of great fighter pilot and superb LSO. Hear his voice below and read his words. I heard that voice many times and it was always a comfort to know that "Bug" was on the platform with the pickle in his hand.

Even though I have watched this many times before when the A-6  was in close and Bug was talking to him and staying with him all the way through to the end with the "STAY WITH IT CALL" the screen got out of focus remembering what it was like to have Bug on the platform and as a friend and the loss we all shared. How many of you remember that sound he could make when he would put his lips together and force air through them and make that high pitched whistle sound that was uniquely      BUG,    Skip

Subject:: A-6 Barrier landing  (left main gear up.)
Here is a great video. A terrific job by the Landing Signal Officer. Watch/listen to the video first then read "the rest of the story". A great Naval Aviator that most carrier jocks knew in the '70's-'80's.
NOTICE THE LIGHT IN THE CENTER OF THE FRAMES MOVING UP/DOWN. IT IS THE ONSTATION PLANE GUARD (DESTROYER) IN THE WAKE OF THE CARRIER, the movement reflecting HOW MUCH THE FLIGHT DECK WAS MOVING .
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRURB7FdsII&feature=player_embedded#!

The Landing Signal Officer referred to and handling this recovery was "Bug" Roach.
CDR Roach was born in Monterey, Calif. and received his Naval Aviator wings in 1966. He served as an F-8 Crusader pilot and Landing Signal Officer (LSO) during the Vietnam War, making combat cruises with three different air wings on three different 27C class carriers. In 1990 the Navy League sponsored an award to recognize professional LSO performance, on the LSO platform. Based on his unsurpassed expertise on the LSO platform, the Navy League felt very strongly that they wanted to name the award the "CDR John "Bug" Roach Paddles Award", while CDR Roach was still on active duty. At the 1990 Tailhook Convention, where the first award was presented, the following facts were supplied about CDR Roach's LSO career:
He made four separate CAG LSO tours. In addition he was recalled on two other occasions as a ready alert CAG LSO due to his expertise. During his tenure as a CAG LSO he waved without mishap:
ten barricade arrestments
twenty single engine approaches
five aircraft missing main landing gear
two A-4 aircraft with major battle damage
the first ever S-3 with an unlocked wing
a night, hand-held radio (PRC-90), talkdown of six aircraft with no meatball and with the flight deck illuminated by the headlights of flight deck tractors, following a total engineering casualty on the ship.
Subsequent to these accomplishments, when events began heating up in the Middle East in 1990, CDR Roach volunteered his services as CAG LSO yet again and deployed with CVW-2 to the war zone. It was on this cruise that he made his 1,000th arrested landing. In more than 25 years of Naval service, CDR Roach never had a non-flying tour. On 2 October 1991 while on an adversary flight in an A-4E off the coast of Southern California, CDR Roach was killed when his aircraft lost power and he was unable to successfully eject from the stricken aircraft. Note Bug's prayer below.

Prayer written by
CDR John "Bug" Roach
1944-1991

Lord, we are the nation! We celebrate our birthday on July 4th, 1776, with the Declaration of Independence as our birth certificate. The bloodlines of the world run in our veins because we offer freedom and liberty to all whom are oppressed. We are many things and many people. We are the nation.
We sprawl from the Atlantic to the Pacific, to Alaska and Hawaii. three million square miles throbbing with industry and with life. We are the forest, field, mountain and desert. We are the wheat fields of Kansas, the granite hills of Vermont, and the snow capped peaks of the Sierra Nevada. We are the Brooklyn Bridge, we are the grain elevators in the farm belt, we are the Golden Gate. We are the nation.
We are 213 million living souls, and yet we are the ghosts of millions who have lived and died for us. We are Nathan Hale and Paul Revere. We are Washington, Jefferson and Patrick Henry. We are Lee, Grant, Abe Lincoln and George Bush. We are the famous and the unknown. We are presidents, we are paupers. We are the nation.
We stood at Lexington and fired the shot heard around the world. We remember the Alamo, the Maine, Pearl Harbor, Inchon and the Persian Gulf. When freedom calls, we answer. We left our heroic dead at Belleau Wood, on the rock of Corregidor, on the bleak slopes of Korea, in the steaming jungles of Vietnam and under the rubble of Beirut. We are the nation.
We are schools and colleges, churches and synagogues. We are a ballot dropped in a box, the harmonious voice of a choir in a cathedral, the crack of a bat and the roar of a crowd in a stadium. We are craftsmen, teachers, businessmen, and judges. We are laborers and nurses. We are parents and we are children. We are soldiers, sailors and airmen. We are peaceful villages, small towns and cities that never sleep. Yes, we are the nation, and these are the things that we are.
We were conceived in freedom, and dear God, if you are willing, in freedom we will spend the rest of our days. May we always be thankful for the blessings you have bestowed upon us. May we be humble to the less fortunate and assist those in need. May we never forget the continuing cost of freedom. May we always remember that if we are to remain the land of the free, we must continue always to be the home of the brave. May our wishbone never be found where our backbone should be. May we possess always, the integrity, the courage and the strength to keep ourselves unshackled, to remain always a citadel of freedom and a beacon of hope to the world.
We are the nation.....this is our wish...this is our hope and this is our prayer...Amen
Commander
John "Bug" Roach
United States Navy
1944-1991

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN




NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

ROLLING THUNDER REMEMBERED Thanks to the Bear … Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻
OPERATION ROLLING THUNDER (1965-1968)…
Thanks to THE BEAR
… … For The List for Sunday, 2 October 2022… Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻

OPERATION ROLLING THUNDER (1965-1968)…
From the archives of rollingthunderremembered.com post for 2 October 1967… NYT, Hanson Baldwin: "NVN SAM Sites Put at 180"…



This following work accounts for every fixed wing loss of the Vietnam War and you can use it to read more about the losses in The Bear's Daily account. Even better it allows you to add your updated information to the work to update for history…skip
Vietnam Air Losses
Access Chris Hobson and Dave Lovelady's work at:  https://www.VietnamAirLosses.com.

This is a list of all Helicopter Pilots Who Died in the Vietnam War
. Listed by last name and has other info

MOAA - Wall of Faces Now Includes Photos of All Servicemembers Killed in the Vietnam War

(This site was sent by a friend last week and I forgot to forward.  The site works, find anyone you knew in "search" feature.  https://www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces/ )


Wall of Faces Now Includes Photos of All Service members Killed in the Vietnam War
By: Kipp Hanley
AUGUST 15, 2022

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Thanks to Brett
Geopolitical Futures:
Keeping the future in focus
Daily Memo: Scholz in the Middle East, Australia's Naval Plans
The German chancellor signed deals to help close Germany's energy gap.
By: GPF Staff

September 26, 2022

Scholz in the Middle East. German Chancellor Olaf Scholz concluded a two-day visit to the Persian Gulf by signing a series of energy deals. The Abu Dhabi National Oil Co., for example, agreed to deliver the first shipment of liquefied natural gas to the Elbehafen terminal in Brunsbuettel, near Hamburg. Scholz's trip was part of Germany's effort to secure new sources of energy as the war in Ukraine and European sanctions on Moscow have led to reduced Russian gas deliveries to Europe.
Australia's naval plans. The U.S. is in talks to build nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, according to a Wall Street Journal report. Under the deal, the U.S. would provide an initial fleet of subs by the mid-2030s as part of the AUKUS pact reached last year. Last month, concerns grew over the U.S. and the U.K.'s ability to help close Australia's capability gap after senior U.S. Navy officials suggested shipyards would struggle to increase production without further investment. The Australian government is also looking to establish a "strategic fleet" of 12 merchant ships to protect the country's critical supply routes.
Italian elections. A center-right coalition led by the Brothers of Italy party won snap parliamentary elections in Italy over the weekend and is set to form the country's most right-wing government since World War II. The party's leader, Giorgia Meloni, has made a name for herself by adopting euroskeptic positions on European affairs.
The U.S. on the peninsula. South Korea and the United States began joint naval drills – their first in five years – near the Korean Peninsula on Monday. The four-day exercises will involve more than 20 vessels and an assortment of aircraft. They come a day after North Korea launched its latest ballistic missile test.
Intensified cooperation. The U.S. and the Philippines will double the number of troops involved in their annual Balikatan exercises next year to 16,000, and increase the number of bilateral activities between them. The defense ministers of both states will meet on Thursday in Hawaii to discuss the arrangements. Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. also called for peace and restraint in the Taiwan Strait, in comments welcomed by Taiwan. A key U.S. ally in the region, the Philippines has been the subject of competition between Washington and Beijing of late.
Drills in Kazakhstan. The Russian-led Collective Security Treaty Organization began military exercises in Kazakhstan's Zhambyl and Alma-Ata regions. The drills, which will run until Oct. 8, will train troops in the conduct of a joint operation in an armed conflict, reconnaissance missions and logistics. CSTO forces helped the Kazakh government quell widespread protests early this year.
Restructuring. Maike Metals International, one of China's largest commodities traders, is planning to sell assets and conduct a broad restructuring to resolve its liquidity problem, according to the company's chair. Maike is already selling off assets and equities, but its final plan could involve shareholding, asset and debt restructuring.
India in Iran. Iran has reportedly offered India's ONGC Videsh Ltd. a 30 percent stake in development of the Farzad-B offshore gas field. The field holds an estimated 23 trillion cubic feet of gas reserves, nearly 14 trillion cubic feet of which are considered recoverable. ONGC's interest in Iranian hydrocarbon projects was previously derailed because of U.S. sanctions on Iran.
Border opening. Venezuela and Colombia will reopen their shared border Monday after seven years of partial or total closure. The move marks the first step in normalizing bilateral ties.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

This Day in U S Military History

1799 – Establishment of Washington Navy Yard. The Washington Navy Yard is the U.S. Navy's oldest shore establishment, in operation since the first decade of the 19th century. It evolved from a shipbuilding center to an ordnance plant and then to the ceremonial and administrative center for the Navy. The yard is home to the Chief of Naval Operations and is headquarters for the Naval Historical Center, the Marine Corps Historical Center, and numerous naval commands.

1950 – The ROK Capital and 3rd Divisions seized Yangyang on the East Coast while in the southeast ROK Marines took the port of Mokpo. Chinese Foreign Minister Chou En-lai warned the Indian Ambassador in Beijing that if the Americans cross the 38th parallel China would enter the war.

1951 – Future jet ace Colonel Francis S. "Gabby" Gabreski, Vice Commander of the 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, downed his third MiG-15 of the war in an F-86 Sabre jet. Colonel Gabreski was a leading World War II ace with 28 German aircraft kills while flying a P-47 Thunderbolt.

Medal of Honor Citations for Actions Taken This Day

*CORRY, WILLIAM MERRILL, JR.
Rank and organization: Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy. Place and date: Near Hartford, Conn., 2 October 1920. Born: 5 October 1889, Quincy, Fla. Accredited to: Florida. Other Navy award: Navy Cross. Citation: For heroic service in attempting to rescue a brother officer from a flame-enveloped airplane. On 2 October 1920, an airplane in which Lt. Comdr. Corry was a passenger crashed and burst into flames. He was thrown 30 feet clear of the plane and, though injured, rushed back to the burning machine and endeavored to release the pilot. In so doing he sustained serious burns, from which he died 4 days later.

CARR, CHRIS (name legally changed from CHRISTOS H. KARABERIS, under which name the medal was awarded)
Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company L, 337th Infantry, 85th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Guignola, Italy, 1-2 October 1944. Entered service at: Manchester, N.H. Birth: Manchester, N.H. G.O. No.: 97, 1 November 1945. Citation Leading a squad of Company L, he gallantly cleared the way for his company's approach along a ridge toward its objective, the Casoni di Remagna. When his platoon was pinned down by heavy fire from enemy mortars, machineguns, machine pistols, and rifles, he climbed in advance of his squad on a maneuver around the left flank to locate and eliminate the enemy gun positions. Undeterred by deadly fire that ricocheted off the barren rocky hillside, he crept to the rear of the first machinegun and charged, firing his submachinegun. In this surprise attack he captured 8 prisoners and turned them over to his squad before striking out alone for a second machinegun. Discovered in his advance and subjected to direct fire from the hostile weapon, he leaped to his feet and ran forward, weaving and crouching, pouring automatic fire into the emplacement that killed 4 of its defenders and forced the surrender of a lone survivor. He again moved forward through heavy fire to attack a third machinegun. When close to the emplacement, he closed with a nerve-shattering shout and burst of fire. Paralyzed by his whirlwind attack, all 4 gunners immediately surrendered. Once more advancing aggressively in the face of a thoroughly alerted enemy, he approached a point of high ground occupied by 2 machineguns which were firing on his company on the slope below. Charging the first of these weapons, he killed 4 of the crew and captured 3 more. The 6 defenders of the adjacent position, cowed by the savagery of his assault, immediately gave up. By his l-man attack, heroically and voluntarily undertaken in the face of tremendous risks, Sgt. Karaberis captured 5 enemy machinegun positions, killed 8 Germans, took 22 prisoners, cleared the ridge leading to his company's objective, and drove a deep wedge into the enemy line, making it possible for his battalion to occupy important, commanding ground.

*KINER, HAROLD G.
Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, Company F, 117th Infantry, 30th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Palenberg, Germany, 2 October 1944. Entered service at: Enid, Okla. Birth: Aline, Okla. G.O. No.: 48, 23 June 1945. With 4 other men, he was leading in a frontal assault 2 October 1944, on a Siegfried Line pillbox near Palenberg, Germany. Machinegun fire from the strongly defended enemy position 25 yards away pinned down the attackers. The Germans threw hand grenades, 1 of which dropped between Pvt. Kiner and 2 other men. With no hesitation, Private Kiner hurled himself upon the grenade, smothering the explosion. By his gallant action and voluntary sacrifice of his own life, he saved his 2 comrades from serious injury or death.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

AMERICAN AEROSPACE EVENTS for October 2, 2020 FIRSTS, LASTS, AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS. THANKS TO HAROLD "PHIL" MYERS CHIEF HISTORIAN AIR FORCE INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE AGENCY

2 October

1912: George A. Gray flew a Burgess Wright plane on the first flight over the Adirondack Mountains, flying from Malone to Saranac Lake, N.Y., a distance of about 85 miles. (24)

1918: The Army's Kettering pilotless aircraft, "The Bug," with preset controls made successful flights at Dayton. "The Bug" has been often called a guided missile in later years. (21)

1944: 1Lt Valmore Beaudrault received credit for downing the first German jet destroyed by Ninth Air Force. (4)

1950: KOREAN WAR. From the FEAF Bomber Command, 22 B-29s attacked a N. Korean military training area at Nanam, destroying 75 percent of the buildings. The 8th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron moved from Itazuke to Taegu to become the first USAF day reconnaissance squadron stationed in Korea. (28)

1956: For the first time, the USAF successfully recovered a full-scale flight-test version of the XSM62 (N69D series) Snark after a flight from Cape Canaveral. (16) (24)

1962: At Vandenberg AFB, an Atlas D completed a combat training launch (CTL). The CTLs preceded the current operational testing program. (6)

1963: The USAF issued a requirement for the Minuteman II missile with a new, larger second stage engine, improved guidance, more range and payload, and increased survivability. (6)

1968: The C-9A flew its first aeromedical mission. (18)

1970: The USAF Special Operations Force at Hurlburt Field took possession of the first Bell UH-1N "Twin Huey." (16) (26)

1981: President Reagan reversed several of President Carter's defense decisions to support force modernization. He planned to construct and deploy 100 B-1B aircraft, continue the ALCM and M-X program, and develop an advanced stealth bomber. He also cancelled the horizontal multiple shelter basing scheme for the M-X in favor of basing in superhard silos. (1) (6) Deputy SECDEF Frank P. Carlucci ordered the Titan II system inactivated. (6)

1991: In the second humanitarian mission to Mongolia, the 834th Airlift Division moved 15 pallets of medical supplies and 8 ambulances to Ulan Bator. (16) (26)

1993: Major earthquakes rolled through central India. Afterwards, C-5s airlifted 1,000 rolls of plastic sheeting, 950 tents, 18,550 five-gallon water containers, 22 pallets of blankets, and other relief supplies to Bombay through 4 October. (16)

2000: The NF-16D (Tail No. 86-0048) Variable In-Flight Simulator Test Aircraft (VISTA) arrived at Edwards AFB to join the AFFTC fleet. It could simulate the flying characteristics of several different aircraft and would be used primarily by the AF Test Pilot School. (3)

2006: ACC declared an initial operating capability for the GBU-39B Small Diameter Bomb, a lowcost and low-collateral damage 250-pound precision strike weapon for use by fighters, bombers and UAVs. (AFNEWS Article, "ACC Declares Small Diameter Bomb Initially Capable," 5 Oct 2006)

2007: The Commandant of Cadets, Brig Gen Susan Y. Desjardins, flew a new C-17 Globemaster III over the U.S. Air Force Academy cadet area in Colorado Springs, Colo. She formally accepted the aircraft for the Air Force at Boeing's facilities in Long Beach, Calif., and flew it to Dover AFB, Del., for duty with the 436th Airlift Wing. (AFNEWS, "Commandant of Cadets Flies New C-17 Globemaster III Home, 2 Oct 2007) At Elmendorf AFB, Alaska, Air Force Reserve officials activated the first F-22 Raptor unit, the 477th Fighter Group. The day also honored the 477th Fighter Group's and the 302nd Fighter Squadron's fabled heritage and their connection to the Tuskegee Airmen. (AFNEWS, Air Force Reserves Stands Up First F-22 Unit," 5 October 2007.)

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Thanks to Brett

ASSESSMENTS
The Weekly Rundown: Protests in Iran, Campaign Season in Nigeria
Sep 26, 2022

A protester in Turkey holds a portrait of Mahsa Amini during a demonstration in support of Amini, a young Iranian woman who died Sept. 16 after being arrested in the Iranian capital of Tehran by the morality police.
(OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)
What We're Tracking
Protests in Iran. Anti-government demonstrations in Iran are likely to continue as anger over issues including police brutality, social restrictions and economic malaise motivates some Iranians to take to the streets. The Sept. 16 death of the young Iranian woman Mahsa Amini in Tehran while in the custody of Iran's morality police on allegations of dressing inappropriately has angered Iranians countrywide and led to some of the strongest efforts by Iranian security forces and government bodies to disperse protests in several years. Because the conservative Iranian government is unlikely to relax social restrictions like the compulsory hijab law, some unrest over the issue is likely to continue in the coming weeks and months.
Campaign season begins in Nigeria. Candidates including Bola Tinubu of the All Progressives Congress, People's Democratic Party candidate Atiku Abubakar and Labour Party candidate Peter Obi will officially begin campaigning Sept. 28 for Nigeria's February 2023 presidential election. Defections between parties, smear campaigns, political violence and electoral corruption — all mainstays of Nigerian elections — will likely ramp up in coming months. Divisions within the opposition PDP meanwhile may lead to increased support for the Labour Party in southern regions, potentially weakening the opposition versus the ruling APC and giving Tinubu an early boost.
Italy's general election. Italy will hold a general election Sept. 25 that polls indicate will result in significant gains for center-right and right-wing political parties. A right-wing government could raise concerns in financial markets about Italy abandoning the economic reforms outgoing Prime Minister Mario Draghi undertook in exchange for billions of euros in EU funds. And while the likely winner of the election, the right-wing Brothers of Italy party, has pledged to respect Italy's pro-Western foreign policy, some of its coalition partners (in particular the right-wing League) have shown sympathy for Russia in the past. This means that while Italy is likely to continue supporting existing EU sanctions against Moscow, Rome may resist efforts to expand them.
Russian annexation referendums conclude in Ukraine. Sham referendums organized by pro-Russian authorities that commenced Sept. 23 in the Kherson, Zaporizhzhia, Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine will conclude Sept. 27, paving the way for Russia to annex the regions. Russia is unlikely to tarry in annexing the territory after the voting ends, and could conclude the necessary treaties with regional authorities and gain parliamentary approval in a matter of days. Either way, the West will not recognize the annexations, and will impose additional sanctions on Russia



--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "TheList" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to skipslist+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/skipslist/003f01d8d66f%241fbdb570%245f392050%24%40san.rr.com.

TheList 6232

The List 6232     TGB

To All,

Good Saturday morning October 1.
Regards,
skip


Today in Naval and Marine Corps History

Today in Naval and Marine Corps History

October 1

1844 Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters.

1880 John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band

1942 USS Roe (DD 418) rescues 17 merchant seamen and two Naval Armed Guard sailors of the freighter SS West Chetac who drifted off the coast of Brazil for eight days after their vessel is sunk by German submarine U 175.

1955 Commissioning of USS Forrestal (CVA-59), first of postwar supercarriers

1980 USS Cochrane (DDG-21) rescues 104 Vietnamese refugees 620 miles east of Saigon

1990 USS Independence (CV-62) enters Persian Gulf (first carrier in Persian Gulf since 1974)


Today in History September 30

This Day in History

October 1
331BC        Alexander the Great decisively shatters King Darius III's Persian army at Gaugamela (Arbela), in a tactical masterstroke that leaves him master of the Persian Empire.
1273        Rudolf of Hapsburg is elected emperor in Germany.
1588        The feeble Sultan Mohammed Shah of Persia, hands over power to his 17-year old son Abbas.
1791        In Paris, the National Legislative Assembly holds its first meeting.
1839        The British government decides to send a punitive naval expedition to China.
1847        Maria Mitchell, American astronomer, discovers a comet and is elected the same day to the American Academy of Arts---the first woman to be so honored. The King of Denmark awarded her a gold medal for her discovery.
1856        The first installment of Gustav Flaubert's novel Madame Bovary appears in the Revue de Paris after the publisher refuses to print a passage in which the character Emma has a tryst in the back seat of a carriage.
1864        The Condor, a British blockade-runner, is grounded near Fort Fisher, North Carolina.
1878        General Lew Wallace is sworn in as governor of New Mexico Territory. He went on to deal with the Lincoln County War, Billy the Kid and write Ben-Hur. His Civil War heroics earned him the moniker Savior of Cincinnati.
1890        Yosemite National Park is dedicated in California.
1908        The Ford Model T, the first car for millions of Americans, hits the market. Over 15 million Model Ts are eventually sold, all of them black.
1942        The German Army grinds to a complete halt within the city of Stalingrad.
1943        British troops in Italy enter Naples and occupy Foggia airfield.
1944        The U.S. First Army begins the siege Aachen, Germany.
1946        Eleven Nazi war criminals are sentenced to be hanged at Nuremberg trials---Hermann Goring, Alfred Jodl, Hans Frank, Wilhelm Frick, Ernst Kaltenbrunner, Wilhelm Keitel, Joachin von Ribbentrop, Fritz Saukel, Arthur Seyss-Inquart, Julius Streicher, and Alfred Rosenberg.
1947        First flight of F-86 Sabre jet fighter, which would win fame in the Korean War.

1949        Mao Zedong establishes the People's Republic of China.
1957        "In God We Trust" appears on US paper currency as an act to distinguish the US from the officially atheist USSR; the motto had appeared on coins at various times since 1864.
1958        The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) replaces the 43-year-old National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in the US.
1960        Nigeria becomes independent from the UK.
1961        The Federal Republic of Cameroon is formed by the merger of East and West Cameroon.
1962        The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson debuts; Carson will remain The Tonight Show host until 1992.
1964        The first Free Speech Movement protest erupts spontaneously on the University of California, Berkeley campus; students demanded an end to the ban of on-campus political activities.
1964        Japanese "bullet trains" (Shinkansen) begin high-speed rail transit between Tokyo and Osaka.
1971        Walt Disney World opens near Orlando, Florida, the second of Disney's "Magic Kingdoms."
1971        First CT or CAT brain scan performed, at Atkinson Morley Hospital in Wimbledon, London.
1974        Five Nixon aides--Kenneth Parkinson, Robert Mardian, Nixon's Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and U.S. Attorney General John Mitchell--go on trial for conspiring to hinder the Watergate investigation.
1975        Legendary boxing match: Muhammad Ali defeats Joe Frazier in the "Thrilla in Manila."
1979        US returns sovereignty of the Panama Canal to Panama.
1982        First compact disc player, released by Sony.
1989        Denmark introduces the world's first "civil union" law granting same-sex couples certain legal rights and responsibilities but stopping short of recognizing same-sex marriages.
1991        Siege of Dubrovnik begins in the Croatian War of Independence.
2009        The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom takes over judicial functions of the House of Lords.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

ROLLING THUNDER REMEMBERED Thanks to the Bear … Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻
OPERATION ROLLING THUNDER (1965-1968)…
Thanks to THE BEAR
… For The List for Saturday, 1 October 2022… Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻

OPERATION ROLLING THUNDER (1965-1968)…
From the archives of rollingthunderremembered.com post for 1 October 1967… NYT writer Tom Hedrick: Reviews the American "strategic interdiction and bridge removal plan."



This following work accounts for every fixed wing loss of the Vietnam War and you can use it to read more about the losses in The Bear's Daily account. Even better it allows you to add your updated information to the work to update for history…skip
Vietnam Air Losses
Access Chris Hobson and Dave Lovelady's work at:  https://www.VietnamAirLosses.com.

This is a list of all Helicopter Pilots Who Died in the Vietnam War
. Listed by last name and has other info

MOAA - Wall of Faces Now Includes Photos of All Servicemembers Killed in the Vietnam War

(This site was sent by a friend last week and I forgot to forward.  The site works, find anyone you knew in "search" feature.  https://www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces/ )


Wall of Faces Now Includes Photos of All Service members Killed in the Vietnam War
By: Kipp Hanley
AUGUST 15, 2022

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Thanks to Tom
View the Latest Edition of "This Week @NASA" (published Sept. 23, 2022)
Folks –

REALLY busy week…..gotta run!

HAPPY reading!

Tom

PS: just drop a note to me if you wish to be removed from distribution!

Outside Reading:







AGENCYWIDE MESSAGE TO ALL NASA EMPLOYEES

Points of Contact: Rebecca Sirmons, rebecca.h.sirmons@nasa.gov, and Andre Valentine, andre.valentine-1@nasa.gov, Office of Communications, NASA Headquarters
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
   
View the Latest Edition of "This Week @NASA" (published Sept. 23, 2022)

View the latest "This Week @NASA," produced by NASA Television, for features on agency news and activities. Stories in this program include:

•    A Critical Preflight Artemis I Demonstration Test
•    NASA Astronaut Frank Rubio Launches to the Space Station
•    Webb Image Captures Clearest View of Neptune's Rings in Decades
•    Webb's First Observations of The Red Planet
•    InSight "Hears" Its First Meteoroid Impacts on Mars
•    DART Uses Jupiter and Europa to Test Navigation System

To watch this episode, click on the image below:



Watch the Video


To access this edition of "This Week @NASA," you may also visit:

--------------------------------------
This notice is being sent agencywide to all employees by NASA INC in the Office of Communications at NASA Headquarters.


NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

: Could the TWA 800 Cover-Up Finally Come Undone? - American Thinker
Thanks to Doctor Rich

Thanks to Bruddah ....


    I'm impressed that no participants or eye witnesses to this horrific event of 26 years ago have come forward to "fess up."

  Somebody pulled the trigger and I don't even know the names of the ships that were involved. I'm sure I could find out, but what's the point? The Gummint has done a great job in covering up this incident. "Yeah, it was a guy in seat 13A that was smoking while on his cell phone that caused a short in the Pupper Snuffer compartment that blew up the main fuel cell. Yeah, that's it! That's the ticket!" NTSB spokes mouth.

  The USS Vincennes shot down an Iranian airliner and we immediately knew who dun it. Not so when we shoot down our own. Had a Republican been President at the time, the press would have latched on to this story like a moray eel chomping down on your wrist. It wouldn't let go until it had the full story or the victim was dead. Or both. But a Republican was not president so they just moved on.

  Somebody gave the order. Somebody locked up the target on the radar. Somebody pulled the trigger. Somebody knows the full story. But the gummint doesn't want us to know. The Gummint doesn't want to take any responsibility for its actions. The Gummint feels totally justified in continuously lying to the nation about its role in this major mistake.

    Bill Clinton has never had to fess up to any of his lies and he never had to make a truthful statement concerning the US Navy and TWA 800. He wasn't responsible for it, but it happened on his watch. No better liar than him to cover up what our Navy did.

    Is it any wonder why no one trusts the Gummint? Why should we?

Bruddah



NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Thanks to Carl


September 30, 2022
Could the TWA 800 Cover-Up Finally Come Undone?
By Jack Cashill

A month ago American Thinker published my article on whistleblower William Teele, the ten-year U.S. Navy vet who shared his own perspective on the TWA Flight 800, the 747 that blew up off the coast of Long Island in July 1996. In that Teele was not on the ship that fired the missile, I asked for those with more information to share what they knew by contacting me through my website.
The quantity and quality of the response stunned me. As a spoiler alert, no respondent admitted to being a witness, and some did not believe the Navy fired the missile. That said, all were respectful and informative. Several added corrective or confirming details. Some sample intros:
While working as a commercial airline (NWA) Captain…
I spent 3-and-a-half years aboard the USS Nimitz…
I'm a retired USN Commander…

I was a GMM or gunners mate missiles while in the US Navy…
I'm retired mil.  I have studied weapons for decades…
I am a retired Navy Surface Warfare Officer Captain…
I was a first officer flying the Airbus A320 for Northwest Airlines…
I was in the Navy for 20 years, four ships (3 of them "shooters")…
I was qualified as a Surface Warfare Officer
As much as I would love to hear from a firsthand witness, I believe the courts hold more immediate potential. On June 28, 2022, attorney John Roddy with the Boston firm of Bailey and Glasser filed a lawsuit on behalf of numerous family members of those killed in the 1996 crash. Based on the research of physicist Tom Stalcup, the suit is stunning in its sophistication and detail.
I first met Stalcup when I interviewed him for a documentary on TWA 800 called "Silenced" that James Sanders and I produced in 2001. I was a latecomer to this extraordinary story, but Stalcup had been deeply involved in the case from very nearly the beginning and remains committed to this day.
As a quick refresher, TWA Flight 800 left JFK airport in New York en route to Paris on July 17, 1996. Twelve minutes after its 8:19 departure the ill-fated 747 blew up off the south coast of Long Island, killing all 230 souls aboard.
The suit wastes no time in establishing its central argument: "After the incident, the federal government released a false report contending that the explosion was the result of an electrical fire in the airplane's center." The real cause, the suit argues, was "an errant United States missile fired at aerial target drones flying nearby."
Based on the "overwhelming evidence" uncovered by Stalcup through his Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) litigation in Massachusetts federal court, the suit names as the government defendants in this tragic mishap the Missile Defense Agency, the United States Department of Defense, and the United States Navy.
The contractor defendants cited are Raytheon and Lockheed Martin. Working "side-by-side," these defendants were reportedly testing the Aegis Weapons System and firing SM-2 missiles with live warheads at aerial missile targets off the coast of New York "in close proximity to commercial airline flight paths." The suit leaves open the possibility that more than one "warship" was involved in the launch.
The suit walks through the well-established facts surrounding the investigation. The FBI froze out the National Transportation Board despite the NTSB's legal responsibility to manage domestic air crashes. According to the suit, "The FBI also enlisted the assistance of the Central Intelligence Agency ("CIA")." Yes, the CIA was involved from day one, but I suspect that "enlisting" the agency was not the FBI's idea.
The suit adds new information, namely that "the FBI removed all copies (original and duplicates) of Navy radar tapes from the Navy, placing them out of the NTSB's reach."
The suit addresses the CIA animation used to discredit the scores of excellent eyewitness, but adds this detail, "Despite outwardly proclaiming that the cause of the TWA 800 explosion was, in the CIA's words, 'NOT A MISSILE,' several internal government communications (that have only come to light in the recent FOIA litigation) indicated that a missile was involved."
The suit reviews the history of Navy's Aegis Missile system responsible for the misfire. The Department of Defense (DOD) pushed the system quickly through production and deployment thinking the missile threat from hostile countries "here and now." Although the suit does not mention this detail, there was a real fear at the time of terrorists using planes as missiles, a fear that proved tragically well-grounded five years later.
The radar needed particular upgrading of "its ability to operate close to shore and to properly integrate into existing systems." This helps explain why the Navy was testing in a crowded air space. To address the deficiencies, the DOD directed its contractors to integrate a new radar and computer system into all new ship designs, known as the SPY-ID(V).
"In 1996 the only option with the hardware and computing power sufficient to operate the SPY-ID(V)," the suit claims, "was a New Jersey land-based testing site called the Combat Systems Engineering and Development Site ("CSEDS")."
Rather than wait five years for ships to be built with the computing power to operate this system, "The SPY-ID(V) was tested on an expedited basis in and around the CSEDS in New Jersey, in a highly congested area."
"In 1996," the suit continues, "the Defendants began testing the SPY-ID(V) using 'simulated and actual targets' in and around New Jersey. Stalcup unearthed evidence that the testing of missiles with live warheads began as early as May 1996.
The suit talks about the videotape, which I have seen, shot by an electrician on the roof of Long Island hospital. The fellow was recording the sunrise and inadvertently captured a missile test off the Long Island's south coast, and this just five days before the TWA 800 disaster. Despite that tragedy, the suit contends, the Navy continued to test its missile system in that same commercial corridor.
The suit cites the testimony of Steve Habeger, the Executive Director of CSEDS's sister site in Virginia. Habeger testified in Stalcup's FOIA suit that he "was personally aware of at least a dozen Aegis missile tests off the East Coast of the United States around this same overall time period." Habeger also testified that within minutes of the disaster, he was ordered "to allow the FBI to remove all Navy radar tapes from his facility that might have recorded the TWA 800 incident." His commanding officer and FBI custody records corroborated his testimony.
Stalcup also discovered that the Joint Terrorism Task Force directed the FBI to obtain original Navy radar tapes showing an object "heading straight for TWA 800." The FBI confiscated these tapes immediately after the crash. They show "an object 'impact' TWA 800, which directly contradicts the FBI's, CIAs, and NTSB's public conclusions that what caused the incident was 'NOT A MISSILE.'"
In sum, "The evidence reveals that TWA 800 was brought down by a missile and the government hid this truth from Plaintiffs and the public at large for over twenty-five years." My 2016 book, TWA 800: The Crash, the Cover Up, the Conspiracy,  book covers much of this information and the political dynamics surrounding the investigation. Stalcup adds what I could only allude to, namely the technological details of how the systems work and why there was such urgency in deploying them.
In last several years especially, many patriotic Americans have come to the reluctant conclusion that, yes, the government is capable of lying to us. Some of them have first-hand knowledge of TWA 800's demise. In the final analysis it will be they who provide the counterweight to the powerful forces that want this suit to fail.
For more information, see www.cashill.com
Image: NTSB


NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Thanks to Brett
Geopolitical Futures: 
Keeping the future in focus
Daily Memo: Putin Announces Annexation
The Russian president called on Kyiv to return to the negotiating table.

By: GPF Staff

September 30, 2022

Putebin's announcement. Following so-called referendums held earlier this week in Donetsk, Luhansk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced the formal annexation of the four occupied regions of Ukraine on Friday. He said the regions would be "Russian forever" and promised to use all available means to protect all of Russia. He also called on Kyiv to return to the negotiating table.
Meddling. During a videoconference with the heads of security and intelligence for the Commonwealth of Independent States, a grouping of post-Soviet countries, Putin accused the West of trying to incite conflict among CIS member states. Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev raised similar concerns on his trip to Abay region, saying forces from abroad intend to sow confusion in Kazakhstan, noting an increase in the spread of misinformation and cyberattacks. The tug-of-war between Russia and the West will be playing out in the post-Soviet space as the war in Ukraine continues.
Erdogan chat. Meanwhile, Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan spoke by phone on Thursday and discussed the situation in Ukraine. Ankara is seeking to mediate between Moscow and Kyiv.
Meeting in Washington. Senior Palestinian Authority official Hussein al-Sheikh will reportedly meet with U.S. national security adviser Jack Sullivan and Secretary of State Antony Blinken over the weekend. It will be the first meeting between senior Palestinian and American officials in Washington in five years.
Chip boost. The Japanese government will provide U.S. chipmaker Micron Technology up to $320 million in subsidies to produce advanced memory chips at its Japanese plant. The deal, which aims at reducing dependence on Taiwanese chipmaker TSMC, was reached after months of negotiations between the two countries on expanding cooperation in semiconductor production.
Ankara offers support. Commenting on the U.S. decision last week to lift an arms embargo against Cyprus, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said Ankara would send reinforcements and arms to the breakaway Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus if necessary.
Trilateral drills. South Korea, the United States and Japan on Friday held anti-submarine exercises near the Korean Peninsula for the first time in five years. This comes amid concerns that North Korea is getting ready to launch a nuclear test.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

This Day in U S Military History……. October 1

1874 – Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his service.

1878 – General Lew Wallace was sworn in as governor of New Mexico Territory. He went on to deal with the Lincoln County War, Billy the Kid and wrote Ben-Hur.

1942 – Bell P-59 Airacomet fighter, 1st US jet, made its maiden flight. Development of the P-59, America's first jet-propelled airplane, was ordered personally by General H. H. Arnold on September 4, 1941. The project was conducted under the utmost secrecy, with Bell building the airplane and General Electric the engine. The first P-59 was completed in mid-1942 and it made its initial flight at Muroc Dry Lake (now Edwards Air Force Base), California. One year later, the airplane was ordered into production, to be powered by I-14 and I-16 engines, improved versions of the original I-A. Bell produced 66 P-59s. Although the airplane's performance was not spectacular and it never got into combat, the P-59 provided training for AAF personnel and invaluable data for subsequent development of higher performance jet airplanes.

1946 – Twelve Nazi war criminals were sentenced to be hanged at Nuremberg trials– Karl Donitz, Hermann Goring, Alfred Jodl, Hans Frank, Wilhelm Frick, Ernst Kaltenbrunner, Wilhelm Keitel, Joachin von Ribbentrop, Fritz Saukel, Arthur Seyss-Inquart, Julius Streicher, and Alfred Rosenberg. Karl Donitz was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Medal of Honor Citations for Actions Taken This Day

1947 – The North American F-86 Sabre flies for the first time. The North American F-86 Sabre — sometimes called the Sabrejet — was a transonic jet fighter aircraft. Produced by North American Aviation, the Sabre is best known as the United States' first swept wing fighter which could counter the similarly-winged Soviet MiG-15 in high-speed dogfights over the skies of the Korean War (1950-53). Considered one of the best and most important fighter aircraft in that war, the F-86 is also rated highly in comparison with fighters of other eras. Although it was developed in the late 1940s and was outdated by the end of the '50s, the Sabre proved versatile and adaptable, and continued as a front-line fighter in numerous air forces until the last active operational examples were retired by the Bolivian Air Force in 1994. Its success led to an extended production run of more than 7,800 aircraft between 1949 and 1956, in the U.S., Japan and Italy. Variants were built in Canada and Australia. The Sabre was by far the most-produced Western jet fighter, with total production of all variants at 9,860 units.

1955 – Commissioning of USS Forrestal (CVA-59), first of postwar supercarriers. Forrestal (CVA-59) was launched 11 December 1954 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. Newport News, Va.; sponsored by Mrs. James V Forrestal, widow of Secretary Forrestal; and commissioned 1 October 1955, Captain R. L. Johnson i n command. From her home port, Norfolk, Va., Forrestal spent the first year of her commissioned service in intensive training operations off the Virginia Capes and in the Caribbean. An important assignment was training aviators in the use of her advance d facilities, a duty on which she often operated out of Mayport, Fla. On 7 November 1956, she put to sea from Mayport to operate in the eastern Atlantic during the Suez Crisis ready to enter the Mediterranean should her great strength be necessary. She returned to Norfolk 12 December to prepare for her first deployment with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, for which she sailed 15 January 1957. On this, as on her succeeding tours of duty in the Mediterranean, Forrestal visited many ports to allow dignitaries and the general public to come aboard and view the tremendous power for peace she represented. For military observers, she sta ged underway demonstrations to illustrate her capacity to bring air power to and from the sea in military operations on any scale. She returned to Norfolk 22 July 1957 for exercises off the North Carolina coast in preparation for her first NATO Operation, "Strikeback," in the North Sea. This deployment, between 3 September and 22 October, found her visiting Southampton England, as well as drilling in the highly important task of coordinating United States naval power with that of other NATO nations. The next year found Forrestal participating in a series of major fleet exercises, as well as taking part in experimental flight operations. During the Lebanon Crisis of summer 1958, the great carrier was again called upon to operate in the ea stern Atlantic to back up naval operations in the Mediterranean. She sailed from Norfolk 11 July to embark an air group at Mayport 2 days later, then patrolled the Atlantic until returning to Norfolk 17 July. On her second tour of duty in the Mediterranean, from 2 September 1958 to 12 March 1959, Forrestal again combined a program of training, patrol, and participation in major exercises with ceremonial, hospitality and public visiting. Her guest list during this cruise was headed by Secretary of Defense N. H. McElroy. Returning to Norfolk, she continued the never ending task of training new aviators, constantly maintaining her readiness for instant reaction to any demand for her services brought on by international events. Visitors during the year included King Hussein of Jordan. Forrestal was decommissioned September 11, 1993.

Medal of Honor Citations for Actions Taken This Day
October 1

KEEN, JOSEPH S.
Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company D, 13th Michigan Infantry. Place and date: Near Chattahoochee River, Ga., 1 October 1864. Entered service at: Detroit, Mich. Born: 24 July 1843, England. Date of issue: 4 August 1899. Citation: While an escaped prisoner of war within the enemy's lines witnessed an important movement of the enemy, and at great personal risk made his way through the enemy's lines and brought news of the movement to Sherman's army.

CLANCY, JAMES T.
Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company C, 1st New Jersey Cavalry. Place and date: At Vaughn Road, Va., 1 October 1864. Entered service at: ——. Birth: Albany, N.Y. Date of issue: 3 July 1865. Citation: Shot the Confederate Gen. Dunovant dead during a charge, thus confusing the enemy and greatly aiding in his repulse.

SCHWAN, THEODORE
Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, 10th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Peebles Farm, Va., 1 October 1864. Entered service at: New York. Born: 9 July 1841, Germany. Date of issue: 12 December 1898. Citation: At the imminent risk of his own life, while his regiment was falling back before a superior force of the enemy, he dragged a wounded and helpless officer to the rear, thus saving him from death or capture.

WRIGHT, ROBERT
Rank and organization: Private, Company G, 14th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Chapel House, Farm, Va., 1 October 1864. Entered service at: Woodstock, Conn. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 25 November 1869. Citation: Gallantry in action.

THOMPSON, JOSEPH H.
Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Army, 110th Infantry, 28th Division. Place and date: Near Apremont, France, 1 October 1918. Entered service at: Beaver Falls, Pa. Born: 26 September 1871, Kilkeel, County Down, Ireland. G.O. No.: 21, W.D., 1925. Citation: Counterattacked by 2 regiments of the enemy, Maj. Thompson encouraged his battalion in the front line of constantly braving the hazardous fire of machineguns and artillery. His courage was mainly responsible for the heavy repulse of the enemy. Later in the action, when the advance of his assaulting companies was held up by fire from a hostile machinegun nest and all but 1 of the 6 assaulting tanks were disabled, Maj. Thompson, with great gallantry and coolness, rushed forward on foot 3 separate times in advance of the assaulting line, under heavy machinegun and antitank-gun fire, and led the 1 remaining tank to within a few yards of the enemy machinegun nest, which succeeded in reducing it, thereby making it possible for the infantry to advance.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

AMERICAN AEROSPACE EVENTS for October 1, 2020 FIRSTS, LASTS, AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS. THANKS TO HAROLD "PHIL" MYERS CHIEF HISTORIAN AIR FORCE INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE AGENCY

1 October

1907: At Mrs. Bell's suggestion, Dr. Alexander Graham Bell formed the Aerial Experiment Association at his summer home in Beinn Breagh, Baddeck, Nova Scotia. The association included Dr. Bell, Frederick W. "Casey" Baldwin, John A. "Douglas" McCurdy, Glenn Curtiss, and Thomas E. Selfridge. (24)

1942: KEY EVENT. Robert M. Stanley flew the Bell XP-59A, the first U.S. turbojet aircraft, for the first time at Muroc Field. (21)

1947: North American's prototype F-86 Sabre (XP-86) first flew at Muroc Dry Lake. (20) (24)

1951: KOREAN WAR/Operation SNOWBALL. In an experiment, through 3 October C-119s from the 315 AD dropped 55-gallon drums filled with napalm behind enemy lines. (28) The USAF activated the 1st Pilotless Bomber Squadron at the Missile Test Center, Cocoa, Fla.

1952: Operation FOX PETER TWO: Through 14 October, in a second mass flight, 75 F-84Gs of the 27 FW, with Col Donald Blakeslee leading, extended air refueling over the western Pacific. The first refueling occurred between California and Hawaii and the second the 2,575 miles between Midway Island and Japan. The Fox Peter operations proved that fighters could be moved to the Orient quickly by air to avoid the corrosion potential of water transport. (18)

1955: The Navy started the super carrier age by commissioning the USS Forrestal, the first designed for jet aircraft. (7)

1957: USAF personnel launched their first intercontinental missile, the XSM-62 Snark, in a flight from Cape Canaveral. (16) (24) TAC received its first F-104C. General Thomas S. Power, the CINCSAC, decided to begin ground alert operations to counter the Soviet ICBM threat. Through 2 October, a Transworld Airlines Jetstream made the first nonstop flight over the Great Circle route from London to San Francisco.

1960: The Ballistic Missile Early Warning System radar post at Thule, Greenland, began operations. It was one of three planned warning sites against enemy attacks on North America. (16) (24) SAC activated the last Atlas E squadron, the 549 SMS, at Francis E. Warren AFB. (6)

1961: The last Atlas F squadron, the 556 SMS, activated at Plattsburgh AFB, N.Y. It was also the last unit activated for the Atlas program. (6)

1963: In a ski-equipped Lockheed C-130 Hercules aircraft, Rear Admiral James R. Reedy (USN) made the first transpolar, nonstop flight from Capetown, South Africa, to McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. This flight covered 4,700 miles in 14 hours 31 minutes and crossed the entire Antarctic continent. (5) (16)

1964: SAC phased out its Atlas-D program by taking the last missile off alert in the 549 SMS at Offutt AFB. (6) Exercise TROPIC LIGHTNING. Through 16 December, the first Tropic Lightning exercise provided live close air support training to soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division on Hawaii. The 18 TFW at Kadena AB sent six F-105Ds to Kaneohe Marine Corps Air Station to participate in the training. They were replaced in late October by six F-105Ds from the 560 TFG at McConnell AFB. (17)

1965: When the USAF Aeronautical Station inactivated at Yokota, a 30-year era of Morse code in the USAF came to an end. Begun in 1935 with the creation of the Aeronautical (Airways) Station - Network, expanded greatly thereafter, and gradually reduced after the close of World War II, the requirement for this type of long-range communication ended with the transfer of WB-50 weather reconnaissance aircraft from Japan. Mariner IV, after broadcasting from a record distance of 191,059,922 miles in space, had its telemetry transmission halted by a radio command from the Goldstone Space Communications Station. The 1502 ATW logged its 600,000th accident-free flying hour, a record in aviation history. (16)

1968: REFORGER/CRESTED CAP. MAC moved 33,043 passengers and 3,796 tons of cargo during a four-month airlift to support this exercise. The airlift moved military personnel, dependents, and equipment from Germany to the US. (16)

1969: The C-5A Galaxy, world's largest aircraft at the time, took off from Edwards AFB with a 410,000-payload, heaviest ever carried by any aircraft. This load was also 21,000 pounds heavier than the C-5A's designed lift capability, and 28,100 pounds heavier than the record it set on 15 June.

1970: TAC made the bare-base concept a reality by establishing the first operationally-ready "heavy bare" squadron, the 336 TFS at Seymour Johnson AFB, NC. (16)

1971: General John D. Ryan, the CSAF, presented the 1970 Cheney Award to Maj Travis Wofford for an act of heroism performed as a helicopter pilot in SEA. (16)

1972: The USAF inactivated the last BOMARC missile squadron. These squadrons started operating in 1969.

1977: VOLANT OAK. The Air Force began a quarterly rotation of AFRES and ANG C-130 aircraft and crews to Howard AFB, Panama Canal Zone. (21)

1980: Operation ELF ONE. Four E-3A AWACS deployed to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to protect Saudi airspace during the Iraq-Iran war. C-141s airlifted supplies and personnel for the operation, while two KC-135s based at the Riyadh Royal Saudi AB refueled the E-3s. (4) (18)

1981: ATC conducted the first Euro-NATO Jet Pilot Training class at Sheppard AFB. The program provided combined pilot training for candidates from NATO nations. (16) 1981: At Mather AFB, ATC began a special program to train German weapons systems officers for duty in the Tornado fighter-bomber. (16) (26)

1983: The Air Force retired the B-52D from its inventory of operational aircraft. This aircraft performed most of the ARC LIGHT bombing missions in SEA from

1966 through 1973. (See 4 October 1983) (1)

1984: Peacekeeper test missile-6 launched at Vandenberg AFB. (12)

1986: The B-1 achieved initial operating capability at Dyess AFB, Texas. (16)

1987: PACAF retired its last T-33 two seat training aircraft. The retirement of 7 T-33 T-Birds at Hickam and 7 more at Clark AB ended 32 years of operations in the command. (16)

1990: AFSC turned Patrick AFB and the space-launch mission to AFSPACE. (21)

1991: MAC C-5s and C-141s delivered two Patriot antimissile batteries to Saudi Arabia to counter a threat from Iraq. (18)

1992: PACAF and USAFE assumed control of intratheater aeromedical airlift forces based in their theaters of operation from AMC. (18)

1993: The AFRES activated its first B-52 unit, the 93d Bomb Squadron, at Barksdale AFB. (16) (26) ACC and AMC swapped aircraft assets. In this exchange, ACC received C-130 Hercules from AMC in return for KC-135 Stratotankers. (16)

1999: The USAF deployed Aerospace Expeditionary Force (AEF) 1 to Southwest Asia. It was the first AEF to deploy under a new rotational system for 10 AEFs. The deployment integrated ANG and the Air Force Reserve with the active duty air forces. Prior to the deployment, the ANG had agreed to supply 10 percent of the planes and personnel for each AEF. (21) (32) The first ANG pilot with Detachment 1, Southeast Air Defense Sector, began flying with the activeduty 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall AFB, Fla., under a new program to have ANG flight instructors train new active duty F-15 pilots.

2002: Gen John P. Jumper, USAF Chief of Staff (CSAF), ordered the deactivation of the Peacekeeper ICBM system. (21)

2007: The Air Force redesignated the 27th Fighter Wing at Cannon AFB, N. Mex., as the 27th Special Operations Wing. Thus, the 27th became the second active-duty special operations wing in the Air Force Special Operations Command. The 73d Special Operations Squadron's MC-130W Combat Spear aircraft was the first plane to move from Hurlburt Field, Fla., to Cannon. The MC-130W handled infiltration, exfiltration, and the resupply of special operations forces, while providing refueling capability for special operations vertical-lift assets like the CV-22 Osprey. (AFNEWS, "New Chapter for Air Force Special Operations Begins," 4 Oct 2007.)

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "TheList" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to skipslist+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/skipslist/004101d8d5ae%2481d8e250%24858aa6f0%24%40san.rr.com.

Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Thelist 6230

The List 6230     TGB

To All,

Good Wednesday Moring September 28

A bit of history and some tidbits
.
Regards
Skip

Today in Naval and Marine Corps History
September 28

1822 Under Commodore David Porter's West India Squadron, the sloop of war USS Peacock raids a pirate camp at Funda Bay, burning two pirate boats, capturing five others, while also liberating "89 sacks of coffee concealed in the woods...."

1850 Flogging on Navy and merchant marine ships is abolished by an appropriation bill by Congress, which President Millard Fillmore signs into law.

1861 During the Civil War, the side-wheel steamer USS Susquehanna captures Confederate schooner San Juan bound for Elizabeth City, N.C., with a cargo of salt, sugar, and gin.

1957 After reconfiguration and reclassification, the former LST-32 becomes USS Alameda County (AVB 1), an advance aviation base ship. The first of her class, she is designated to provide fuel, spare parts, technicians, and facilities necessary to establish and operate an airstrip for patrol and carrier aircraft in locations where there are no base facilities.

1964 The first deployment of a Polaris A-3 missile takes place on board USS Daniel Webster (SSBN 626) from Charleston, S.C.

1991 USS Asheville (SSN 758) is commissioned during a ceremony at Newport News, Va. The Los Angeles-class nuclear-powered submarine is the fourth ship in the Navy to be named after the city in North Carolina, and is ideally suited for covert surveillance, intelligence gathering and special forces missions.

1991 USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) is christened and launched at San Diego, Calif. The fast combat support ship delivers petroleum products, ammunition, food and other cargo to ships at sea. It is Military Sealift Commands largest combat logistics ship and the third Navy vessel to be named after Mount Rainier in Washington. The ship is based out of Bremerton, Wash.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Today in History: September 28

0048 On landing in Egypt, Pompey is murdered on the orders of Ptolemy.

0855 Emperor Lothar dies in Gaul, and his kingdom is divided between his three sons.

1066 William, Duke of Normandy, soon to be known as William the Conqueror invades England.

1106 King Henry of England defeats his brother Robert at the Battle of Tinchebrai and reunites England and Normandy.

1238 James of Aragon retakes Valencia, Spain, from the Arabs.

1607 Samuel de Champlain and his colonists return to France from Port Royal Nova Scotia.

1794 The Anglo-Russian-Austrian Alliance of St. Petersburg, which is directed against France, is signed.

1864 Union General William Rosecrans blames his defeat at Chickamauga on two of his subordinate generals. They are later exonerated by a court of inquiry.

1874 Colonel Ronald Mackenzie raids a war camp of Comanche and Kiowa at the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon, Texas, slaughtering 2,000 of their horses.

1904 A woman is placed under arrest for smoking a cigarette on New York's Fifth Avenue.

1912 W.C. Handy's "Memphis Blues" is published.

1913 Race riots in Harriston, Mississippi, kill 10 people.

1924 Three U.S. Army aircraft arrive in Seattle, Washington after completing a 22-day round-the-world flight.

1928 Sir Alexander Fleming discovers penicillin when he notices a bacteria-killing mold growing in his laboratory; it remained for Howard Florey and Ernst Chain to isolate the active ingredient, allowing the "miracle drug" to be developed in the 1940s.

1939 Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union agree on a division of Poland; Warsaw surrenders to German troops.

1958 France ratifies a new constitution.

1959 Explorer VI, the U.S. satellite, takes the first video pictures of earth.

1961 Military coup in Damascus ends the Egypt-Syria union known as the United Arab Republic that was formed Feb. 1, 1958.

1963 Roy Lichtenstein's pop art work Whaam!, depicting in comic-book style a US jet shooting down an enemy fighter, is exhibited for the first time; it will become one of the best known examples of pop art.

1995 Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) leader Yasser Arafat sign an interim agreement concerning settlement on the Gaza Strip.

1996 Afghanistan's former president (1986-92) Mohammad Najibullah tortured and murdered by the Taliban.

2008 SpaceX launches the first private spacecraft, Falcon 1.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

ROLLING THUNDER REMEMBERED Thanks to the Bear … Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻
OPERATION ROLLING THUNDER (1965-1968)…
Thanks to THE BEAR
… For The List for Wednesday, 28 September 2022… Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻

OPERATION ROLLING THUNDER (1965-1968)…
From the archives of rollingthunderremembered.com post for 28 September 1967… "Morton Assails LBJ"…




This following work accounts for every fixed wing loss of the Vietnam War and you can use it to read more about the losses in The Bear's Daily account. Even better it allows you to add your updated information to the work to update for history…skip
Vietnam Air Losses
Access Chris Hobson and Dave Lovelady's work at:  https://www.VietnamAirLosses.com.

This is a list of all Helicopter Pilots Who Died in the Vietnam War
. Listed by last name and has other info

MOAA - Wall of Faces Now Includes Photos of All Servicemembers Killed in the Vietnam War

(This site was sent by a friend last week and I forgot to forward.  The site works, find anyone you knew in "search" feature.  https://www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces/ )


Wall of Faces Now Includes Photos of All Service members Killed in the Vietnam War
By: Kipp Hanley
AUGUST 15, 2022

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

Thanks to Brett
The Weekly Rundown: Protests in Iran, Campaign Season in Nigeria

(OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)
What We're Tracking
Protests in Iran. Anti-government demonstrations in Iran are likely to continue as anger over issues including police brutality, social restrictions and economic malaise motivates some Iranians to take to the streets. The Sept. 16 death of the young Iranian woman Mahsa Amini in Tehran while in the custody of Iran's morality police on allegations of dressing inappropriately has angered Iranians countrywide and led to some of the strongest efforts by Iranian security forces and government bodies to disperse protests in several years. Because the conservative Iranian government is unlikely to relax social restrictions like the compulsory hijab law, some unrest over the issue is likely to continue in the coming weeks and months.
Campaign season begins in Nigeria. Candidates including Bola Tinubu of the All Progressives Congress, People's Democratic Party candidate Atiku Abubakar and Labour Party candidate Peter Obi will officially begin campaigning Sept. 28 for Nigeria's February 2023 presidential election. Defections between parties, smear campaigns, political violence and electoral corruption — all mainstays of Nigerian elections — will likely ramp up in coming months. Divisions within the opposition PDP meanwhile may lead to increased support for the Labour Party in southern regions, potentially weakening the opposition versus the ruling APC and giving Tinubu an early boost.
Italy's general election. Italy will hold a general election Sept. 25 that polls indicate will result in significant gains for center-right and right-wing political parties. A right-wing government could raise concerns in financial markets about Italy abandoning the economic reforms outgoing Prime Minister Mario Draghi undertook in exchange for billions of euros in EU funds. And while the likely winner of the election, the right-wing Brothers of Italy party, has pledged to respect Italy's pro-Western foreign policy, some of its coalition partners (in particular the right-wing League) have shown sympathy for Russia in the past. This means that while Italy is likely to continue supporting existing EU sanctions against Moscow, Rome may resist efforts to expand them.
Russian annexation referendums conclude in Ukraine. Sham referendums organized by pro-Russian authorities that commenced Sept. 23 in the Kherson, Zaporizhzhia, Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine will conclude Sept. 27, paving the way for Russia to annex the regions. Russia is unlikely to tarry in annexing the territory after the voting ends, and could conclude the necessary treaties with regional authorities and gain parliamentary approval in a matter of days. Either way, the West will not recognize the annexations, and will impose additional sanctions on Russia.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

This Day in U S Military History

September 28

1542 – Portuguese explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo sails into present-day San Diego Bay during the course of his explorations of the northwest shores of Mexico on behalf of Spain. It was the first known European encounter with California. At San Diego, Cabrillo landed at Point Loma Head, now part of the Cabrillo National Monument. He then sailed on to explore much of the rest of the California coast. During one landing, he broke his leg and apparently fell sick with complications from the injury. He died in January 1543, probably on San Miguel Island off the Santa Barbara coast. Despite his reports of the appealing California coastline, the first Spanish settlement was not established in California until 1769, when Father Junípero Serra founded his mission at San Diego.

1901 – The Balangiga Massacre on Samar Island, Philippine villagers surprised Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment. Twenty-two were wounded in action and four were missing in action. Eight died later of wounds received in combat; only four escaped unscathed. The villagers captured about 100 rifles and 25,000 rounds of ammunition and suffered 28 dead and 22 wounded.

1942 – Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold gives highest priority to the development of two exceptional aircraft–the B-35 Flying Wing and the B-36 Peacemaker–intended for bombing runs from bases in the United States to targets in Europe. General Arnold was a man of distinction from the beginning of his career: Not only was he one of the first pilots in the U.S. Signal Corps, he was taught to fly by none other than one of the Wright brothers. During World War I, Arnold was director of aviation training for the Army. Between the wars, he embraced a controversial military philosophy that emphasized strategic bombing, eliminating the need for the use of ground forces altogether. At the time of the United States' entry into the Second World War, the Army Air Forces had become an increasingly distinct military service. Arnold was made its first chief. Along with this honor came the opportunity of a seat with the Joint Chiefs of Staff; initially intended to boost his status to that of his counterpart in Britain, it also increased the stature and independence of the Army Air Forces. Arnold was able to form alliances with British RAF allies who also favored the use of strategic bombing in lieu of ground-force operations. In 1942, Arnold gave the highest priority to the development of two extra long-distance transatlantic planes that would prove most useful to his strategic bombing game plan: the B-35 and the B-36 transatlantic bombers. The B-35 had been first proposed in early 1941, intended for use in defending an invaded Britain. But the design was so radical (it was tailless), the plane was put on the back burner. It was finally revived because of advantages the plane afforded over the B-36–bombing range in relation to gross weight, for example. Fifteen B-35 planes were ordered for construction–but the first did not take flight until 1946. Designs for the B-36 were also developed early in 1941, on the assumption that the United States would inevitably be drawn into the war and it would need a bomber that could reach Europe from bases in America. It was to be a massive plane–162 feet long with a 230-foot wingspan. But its construction lagged, and it was not completed until after the war. Although Hap's "high priority" could not cut through the military bureaucracy, 1947 would see the Nation Defense Act establish an autonomous Air Force–a dream for which he had worked. The B-35 would become the prototype for the B-2 Stealth bomber built in 1989. And the B-36 was used extensively by U.S. Strategic Air Command until 1959, but never dropped a bomb.

1944 – Elements of the US forces deployed on Peleliu land on the small islands Negesbus and Kongauru. There is little resistance. On Peleliu, fighting is localized around Mount Umurbrogol where US forces attempt to eliminate individual Japanese strong points.

1972 – Weekly casualty figures are released that contain no U.S. fatalities for the first time since March 1965. There were several reasons for this. President Nixon's troop withdrawal program, first initiated in the fall of 1969, had continued unabated even through the height of the fighting during the 1972 North Vietnamese "Easter Offensive." By this time in the war, there were less than 40,000 U.S. troops left in South Vietnam. Of this total, only a small number, mostly advisors, were involved in ground combat. In addition, it appeared that the North Vietnamese offensive, which had been blunted by the South Vietnamese with the aid of massive U.S. airpower, was finally winding down; there had been a general lull in ground fighting for the sixth straight day. South Vietnamese losses continued to be high since they had assumed the responsibility for fighting the ground battle in the absence of U.S. combat troops.

Medal of Honor Citations for Actions Taken This Day

*MILLER, OSCAR F.
Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Army, 361st Infantry, 91st Division. Place and date: Near Gesnes, France, 28 September 1918. Entered service at: Los Angeles, Calif. Birth: Franklin County, Ark. G.O. No.: 16, W.D. 1919. Citation: After 2 days of intense physical and mental strain, during which Maj. Miller had led his battalion in the front line of the advance through the forest of Argonne, the enemy was met in a prepared position south of Gesnes. Though almost exhausted, he energetically reorganized his battalion and ordered an attack. Upon reaching open ground the advancing line began to waver in the face of machinegun fire from the front and flanks and direct artillery fire. Personally leading his command group forward between his front-line companies, Maj. Miller inspired his men by his personal courage, and they again pressed on toward the hostile position. As this officer led the renewed attack he was shot in the right leg, but he nevertheless staggered forward at the head of his command. Soon afterwards he was again shot in the right arm, but he continued the charge, personally cheering his troops on through the heavy machinegun fire. Just before the objective was reached he received a wound in the abdomen, which forced him to the ground, but he continued to urge his men on, telling them to push on to the next ridge and leave him where he lay. He died from his wounds a few days later.

SCHAFFNER, DWITE H.
Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 306th Infantry, 77th Division. Place and date: Near St. Hubert's Pavillion, Boureuilles, France, 28 September 1918. Entered service at: Falls Creek, Pa. Birth: Arroya, Pa. G.O. No.: 15, W.D., 1923. Citation: He led his men in an attack on St. Hubert's Pavillion through terrific enemy machinegun, rifle, and artillery fire and drove the enemy from a strongly held entrenched position after hand-to-hand fighting. His bravery and contempt for danger inspired his men, enabling them to hold fast in the face of 3 determined enemy counterattacks. His company's position being exposed to enemy fire from both flanks, he made 3 efforts to locate an enemy machinegun which had caused heavy casualties. On his third reconnaissance he discovered the gun position and personally silenced the gun, killing or wounding the crew. The third counterattack made by the enemy was initiated by the appearance of a small detachment in advance of the enemy attacking wave. When almost within reach of the American front line the enemy appeared behind them, attacking vigorously with pistols, rifles, and handgrenades, causing heavy casualties in the American platoon. 1st Lt. Schaffner mounted the parapet of the trench and used his pistol and grenades killing a number of enemy soldiers, finally reaching the enemy officer leading the attacking forces, a captain, shooting and mortally wounding the latter with his pistol, and dragging the captured officer back to the company's trench, securing from him valuable information as to the enemy's strength and position. The information enabled 1st Lt. Schaffner to maintain for S hours the advanced position of his company despite the fact that it was surrounded on 3 sides by strong enemy forces. The undaunted bravery, gallant soldierly conduct, and leadership displayed by 1st Lt. Schaffner undoubtedly saved the survivors of the company from death or capture

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

This Day in Aviation History" brought to you by the Daedalians Airpower Blog Update. To subscribe to this weekly email, go to https://daedalians.org/airpower-blog/.

September 19, 2007
An A-10C of the 104th Fighter Squadron flies the first combat sortie for the newly modified Warthog in action over Iraq. The 104th FS is part of the Maryland Air National Guard's 175th Wing.

September 20, 1988
The Special Operations Combined Test Force conducted the first flight of the MC-130H Combat Talon II evaluation program. The MC-130H Combat Talon II provides infiltration, exfiltration and resupply of special operations forces and equipment in hostile or denied territory. Secondary missions include psychological operations, and helicopter and vertical lift air refueling.

September 21, 1961
The Boeing CH-47 Chinook helicopter made its first flight. The Chinook is an American twin-engined, tandem rotor, heavy-lift helicopter developed by American rotorcraft company Vertol and manufactured by Boeing Vertol (later renamed Boeing Helicopter and now named Boeing Rotorcraft Systems).

September 22, 1963
The Air Force Academy chapel—destined to become world famous—is dedicated. Six years earlier, the design was almost scrapped as an "insult to religion and Colorado."

September 23, 1951
Using the Shoran bombing technique, 8 B-29s from the 19th Bomb Group knock out the center span of the Sunchon rail bridge despite 9/10ths cloud cover.

September 24, 1929
Lt. James H. Doolittle makes the first all-blind flight at Mitchel Field. Although a check pilot accompanies him, Doolittle takes off in a Consolidated NY-2 airplane with a completely covered cockpit, flies a short distance, and lands.

September 25, 2010
The first Space Based Space Surveillance (SBSS) satellite reaches orbit, launched aboard an Orbital Sciences Corp. Minotaur IV booster from Vandenberg AFB, Calif.

September 26, 1971
A Sikorsky HH-53C Super Jolly Green Giant, crewed by Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Joseph Lawrence ("Jay") Crowe, Jr., CGA '62 (Pilot), Hampton (Copilot), William Simm (Flight Engineer), Daniel G. Manion (Pararescue Jumper) and Richard L. Steed (Pararescue Jumper), rescued the crew of a North American Aviation OV-10A Bronco (call sign "RUSTIC 07″), Lieutenant Lansford Elmer Trapp, Jr., and Cambodian observer, Sergeant Chap Khorn, after they ejected from their 12.7mm-damaged aircraft, about 10 miles (16 kilometers) northwest of Kampong Cham, Cambodia. Read the full story of the rescue here.

September 27, 1965
Company test pilot John W. Conrad makes the first flight of the Navy's LTV YA-7A Corsair II attack aircraft at NAS Dallas, Tex. Conrad will make the first flight of the USAF version of the SLUF (Short Little Ugly Feller—polite form) on April 5, 1968. A-7s would be used by both services in Vietnam and will still be in Navy service during Desert Storm.

September 28, 1912
Second Lieutenant Lewis Cassidy Rockwell was flying a Wright Model B, Signal Corps Aeroplane No. 4, at the United States Army training field at College Park, Maryland, where he was being trained as a military aviator. Corporal Frank S. Scott, U.S. Army Signal Corps, a mechanic on these airplanes, rode as a passenger aboard Lieutenant Rockwell's airplane. The plane crashed, killing both. Corporal Scott was the first United States enlisted soldier to be killed in an airplane crash. The crash was also the first in which two or more persons were killed.

September 29, 1988
Launch of the space shuttle Discovery ends the long stand-down of the US manned space program in the wake of the Challenger disaster.  As I remember Hoot Gibson was the pilot….skip

September 30, 1976
B-1 Phase I testing was completed after 64 sorties and 342.9 flight hours. While it was a combined DT&E and OT&E effort, the primary objective was to generate data for the production of the new bomber.

October 1, 1957
The first flight was flown in a series of Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) suitability tests for the Douglas B-66B. The purpose was to evaluate the suitability of the twin engine light bomber to the high stresses involved in the toss-bomb maneuver.

October 2, 1942
Marine Maj. Bob Galer, leading a force of a dozen Grumman F4F-4 Wildcats, goes against nine Mitsubishi G4M (Allied code name "Betty") bombers over Guadalcanal, but quickly realizes he has been caught in an ambush, as 36 Mitsubishi A6M Zero ('Zeke') fighters swoop down. He fights his way out of the engagement, shooting down two Zeros. By October, his total of aerial victories will reach 13. Galer was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism and leadership

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

AMERICAN AEROSPACE EVENTS for September 28, 2020 FIRSTS, LASTS, AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS. THANKS TO HAROLD "PHIL" MYERS CHIEF HISTORIAN AIR FORCE INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE AGENCY

28 September

1912: Cpl Frank S. Scott, chief mechanic for the Wright Scout, became the first enlisted fatality in Signal Corps aviation. He died when the aircraft piloted by Lt L. C. Rockwell crashed at College Park. (11)

1918: A pilot on one JN-4 maneuvered another JN-4 solely by radio over Langley Field. (24) 1Lt E. S. Brewer and Gunnery Sergeant H. B. Wersheiner scored the first Marine aerial victory over Belgium. (10)

1921: MACKAY TROPHY. Lt John A. Macready flew his Lepere Biplane to a 34,508-foot world record. He earned the Mackay Trophy for this flight. (9) (24)

1923: In the Schneider Cup seaplane race, Lt David Rittenhouse set a 169.9 MPH world speed record for seaplanes over a 200- kilometer closed course. (24)

1948: The Army Signal Corps released a balloon at Belmar, N.J., and it set a 140,000-foot altitude record. (24) NACA reported that a ramjet missile had exceeded 1,600 MPH on a flight. (16)

1950: At Holloman AFB, eight white mice survived a balloon flight to 97,000 feet. (16) (24) KOREAN WAR. The 7 FBS, the first jet fighter squadron to operate from a base in Korea, moved from Itazuke to Taegu. Three RB-45 Tornadoes, the first jet reconnaissance aircraft in the USAF inventory, arrived in the Far East. (28)

1951: KOREAN WAR. An F-80 flew a 14-hour, 15-minute combat mission with eight refuelings from KB-29M tankers. FEAF informed the Air Force in October of what may have been the longest flight on record for jet aircraft using in-flight refueling. (17) (28)

1954: The McDonnell YF-101A Voodoo first flew at Edwards AFB. The F-101 was the heaviest, fastest, single-seat US fighter of this period. A reconnaissance variant came out later, making the F-101 the first used for supersonic photo reconnaissance. (3) (12)

1961: Scientists fired two onboard spinup rockets to change the rate of rotation on TIROS II after 10 months in orbit. (24)

1962: General Dynamics/Astronautics fired a Centaur flight stage at 30,000 pounds thrust for the first time at Sycamore Canyon, Calif. (24) A SAC crew launched its first Minuteman I from Vandenberg AFB. (1) SAC's declaration of the 568 SMS at Larson AFB as operational ended the deployment of Titan I missiles. (6)

1964: The Navy launched the USS Daniel Webster, the first sub equipped with Polaris A-3 missiles, from Charleston. (5) (16) With eight KC-135s, the Yankee Team Tanker Task Force (also the Foreign Legion), started supporting PACAF fighter combat operations. (1)

1965: John B. McKay flew the X-15 on its 150th flight to an altitude of 295,000 feet and speed of 3,682 MPH.

1968: Bernie J. Dvorscak flew the XV-4B Hummingbird II VSTOL aircraft on a 28-minute maiden flight from Dobbins AFB. (5) (16)

1983: The USAF designated the new EF-111A tactical electronic jamming aircraft as the Raven. (16)

1995: At Yokota AB, a 32-year-old C-130 Hercules in the 36 AS flew its 25,000th flying hour. (16)

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

World News for 28 September thanks to Military Periscope

USA—Coast Guard Cutter Monitors Chinese, Russian Warships Near Alaska
Sky News | 09/28/2022
A U.S. Coast Guard cutter monitored a joint Chinese and Russian naval convoy that sailed near Alaska, reports Sky News (U.K.).
Last week, the cutter Kimball spotted three Chinese and four Russian warships, including a guided-missile cruiser and a destroyer, sailing in a single line about 90 miles (140 km) from Alaska's uninhabited Kiska Island, the news station reported on Tuesday.
The Kimball, supported by a Coast Guard C-130 Hercules surveillance aircraft, monitored the convoy before it dispersed.
The joint convoy demonstrates growing Chinese and Russian interest in the Arctic region, analysts said.


USA—Top Senators Express Support For Designation Of Russia As Terrorism Sponsor
Stars And Stripes | 09/28/2022
Two important senators on the Senate Armed Services Committee have expressed support for designating Russia as a state sponsor of terrorism, reports the Stars and Stripes.
On Monday, Senators Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) announced their support for the designation, saying that there was strong recognition within the 26-member committee that Moscow belongs on the list.
"All we have to do is look at the scenes from Bucha and Izium, where they've uncovered torture chambers, mass graves" Shaheen said, accusing President Putin and his government of "sponsoring terrorism, [and using] rape as a weapon of war against the women of Ukraine."
Tillis also cited the Kremlin's support for the Wagner Group mercenary organization that has been accused of war crimes and violence against civilians in Africa.
The power to make the designation ultimately lies with Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who has indicated that Russia should not be added to the list since it would further hinder relations and could potentially make it harder to deliver aid to Ukraine.


USA—VP Harris Reaffirms Support For Taiwan, Slams China In Japan Visit
Fox News | 09/28/2022
Vice President Kamala Harris criticized China's aggressive posture in the Pacific during a visit to the U.S. naval base at Yokosuka, Japan, reports Fox News.
Harris visited the base on Wednesday during an Asia tour. During a speech, she slammed China's military activities, including efforts to challenge the freedom of the seas and accusing Beijing of using its military and economic power to coerce its neighbors.
She singled out Chinese aggression against Taiwan, such as recent provocations across the Taiwan Strait, and pledged U.S. support for the island nation consistent with longstanding American policy.
Harris is scheduled to travel to South Korea on Thursday.


USA—White House Welcomes Russian Asylum Seekers
White House | 09/28/2022
White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre says that the U.S. welcomes Russians fleeing President Vladimir Putin's mobilization order to fight in Ukraine, reports the White House.
During a press briefing on Tuesday, Jean-Pierre said Russian asylum claims will be adjudicated on a case-by-case basis, and that "we welcome any folks who are seeking asylum."
She emphasized that widespread protests and tens of thousands of men fleeing Russia indicate that the Kremlin's unprovoked war in Ukraine is unpopular.
Jean-Pierre also noted that the White House continues to maintain that the only person who can stop the war is Putin.


Ukraine—Melitopol Mayor Claims 0.5 Percent Turnout For Russian Referendum
Ukrinform | 09/28/2022
Melitopol Mayor Ivan Fedorov says that only 0.5 percent of residents in Russian-occupied areas of Ukraine's southern Zaporizhzhia region took part in Moscow's illegal referendum, reports Ukrinform.
Last week, Russia announced that it would hold referendums from Sept. 23-27 in the occupied Kherson, Zaporizhhzia, Donetsk and Luhansk regions on annexation.
Russian occupation authorities claim that 97 percent of voters in occupied Ukraine approved annexation by Moscow, including 93 percent in Zaporizhzhia.
Fedorov thanked the residents of Melitopol for resisting Russian occupation, saying that only 0.5 percent of the population turned out for the sham referendum.
He emphasized that the Ukrainian government would continue to pay pensions and salaries to public sector employees and ensure all social benefits for those in Russian-occupied Ukraine.


China—Mooring Trials Underway For Advanced Aircraft Carrier
Global Times | 09/28/2022
China's third and most advanced aircraft carrier has begun mooring trials, reports the state-run Global Times (Beijing).
On Sept. 23, the official China Central Television (CCTV) reported that the testing had begun, indicating smooth progress since the Fujian was launched in June.
Mooring trials are focused on testing onboard equipment and machinery and ensuring compatibility.
Equipment has been installed and calibrated as part of the recent trials. Fitting out includes the installation of fuel pipes, gas pipes, electric devices and weapon systems, according to Chinese experts.
The Fujian will be China's third aircraft carrier and the first built to an entirely indigenous design. Beijing says it features advanced electromagnetic catapults and arresting systems similar to those on USS Gerald R. Ford.


United Kingdom—Littoral Response Group Deploys To Med
Royal Navy Press Release | 09/28/2022
The British Royal Navy has deployed an amphibious response force to the Mediterranean Sea to conduct joint operations with allies in the region, reports the service.
Littoral Response Group North is designed to deploy forces to places of strategic import to London with a focus on Europe.
The group consists of the flagship, the amphibious transport dock Albion, the destroyer Defender, support ships Argus and Mounts Bay and the tanker Tidesurge.
Other capabilities include three helicopter squadrons and the Royal Marines of 45 Commando, the Royal Navy said on Monday.
The deployment, scheduled to last for several months, is intended to help develop Britain's Littoral Strike concept and continue to build ties with partners in the region, service officials said.


Argentina—Government Announces Plans For Fighter Purchase
Defense News | 09/28/2022
The Argentinean government has announced plans to buy new fighter jets to revamp its aging fleet, reports Defense News.
Earlier this month, the government told lawmakers that it planned to spend US$664 million to buy new jets and another US$20 million for new infrastructure to support them.
The government is seeking "a multirole fighter jet fitted with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, an in-flight refueling system compatible with the tanker aircraft currently in the inventory of the Argentinean air force, a tactical data link and an electronic warfare defensive suite," according to a statement.
An open architecture design would be needed to integrate weapons and systems of any origin, since Argentina has banned any British systems or components in the aircraft.
Argentinean options are also limited by the British arms embargo dating to the Falkland Islands War in 1981.
Aircraft reportedly under consideration include the joint Chinese-Pakistani JF-17, the American F-16, Indian Tejas, Russian MiG-35, and Israeli Kfir.


Democratic Republic of the Congo—22 Die In Ugandan Army Helicopter Crash In East
Reuters | 09/28/2022
At least 22 people have been killed in a Ugandan helicopter crash in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, reports Reuters.
A Congolese army spokesman told the wire service that at least 22 people were killed when two Ugandan military helicopters supporting operations against the rebel Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) went down.
Unnamed sources told the Daily Monitor (Kampala) that more than a dozen Ugandan troops were killed when an Mi-17 transport helicopter crashed while taking off after making a food delivery.
The helicopter had not landed on the first attempt because the landing zone was not large enough, the sources said. The helicopter returned on the understanding that the zone had been expanded and landed safely.
However, while taking off after delivering supplies, the Mi-17's tail rotor struck a tree, putting it into a spin until it crashed on the troops collecting the food, said the sources.


Germany—CIA Warned Of Potential For Attacks On Baltic Sea Pipelines
TVP World | 09/28/2022
U.S. intelligence warned Germany of possible sabotage attacks on natural gas pipelines running from Russia over the summer, reports the TVP World (Warsaw), citing German media.
On Monday, a pair of explosions were reported near Denmark's Bornholm Island in the Baltic Sea.
On Tuesday, Der Spiegel reported that the CIA had warned the German government over the summer about the possibility of attacks on pipelines under the Baltic Sea.
There has been no confirmed cause of the blasts affecting the Nord Stream pipelines, but some European leaders suspect it was sabotage.
The extent of the damage suggests that the pipelines would not be able to deliver gas to Europe this winter even if there was the political will to do so, said analysts. European countries have been cutting their purchases of gas from Russia since it launched its unprovoked invasion of Ukraine in February.


Guyana—IMF Raises Concern About Oil-Fueled Growth
International Monetary Fund | 09/28/2022
Guyana's oil gross domestic product (GDP) is projected to double in 2022, and grow by 30 percent for the next four years, raising concerns about sustainable and equitable economic growth, reports the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
Guyana experienced a pandemic-induced recession in 2020, worsened by a protracted political transition. In 2021, non-oil economic growth recovered despite major flooding.
The South American country is believed to have about 11 billion barrels of commercially recoverable oil reserves, which has the potential to profoundly change Guyana's economy, the IMF said in a report published on Tuesday.
This oil wealth if wisely managed could help Guyana build substantial fiscal and external buffers to absorb shocks while addressing infrastructure shortcomings and human development needs, analysts said.
The IMF emphasized the challenges related to the volatility on global oil prices and effective management of natural resources and the need for continued prudent policies and structural reforms, with IMF technical aid, to avoid the development of economic vulnerabilities.


Iran—IRGC Launches Drone, Artillery Strikes On Kurdish Group In Iraq
Iran International | 09/28/2022
The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) says it has attacked Kurdish separatist groups in Iraqi Kurdistan, accusing them of supporting protests in Iran, reports Iran International (U.K.).
On Monday, the IRGC said it had conducted drone strikes against the Komala Party of Iranian Kurdistan and Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan in Iraqi Kurdistan, the second such attacks in days.
On Saturday, the IRGC launched artillery strikes against Kurdish opposition groups in the Sidakan district in Iraq's northern Erbil province.
Tehran accused the Kurdish groups of inciting violence in Iran.
Iran has experienced more than a week of demonstrations in the wake of the death of a young Kurdish woman in the custody of the Iranian morality police. The protests began in Tehran and the woman's home province of Iranian Kurdistan and have since spread around the country.


Latvia—Pair Of U.S. HIMARS Rocket Launchers Join Namejs Drills
Military Times | 09/28/2022
The U.S. Army is sending a pair of multiple rocket launchers to take part in a Latvian national military exercise, reports the Military Times.
Around a dozen specialist personnel and two HIMARS launchers will take part in Latvia's Namejs national combat readiness exercise, the newspaper said on Monday.
The U.S. Army is using the opportunity to practice rapidly deploying the systems to Europe. Two U.S. Special Operations Command C-130 transports will carry the HIMARS to Latvia.
Taking part in the deployment is the 3rd Battery, 321st Field Artillery Regiment, which is under the command of the 1st Infantry Division Artillery.


North Korea— Pair Of Ballistic Missiles Test-Fired
Yonhap | 09/28/2022
North Korea has test-fired more short-range ballistic missiles (SRBM), reports the Yonhap news agency (Seoul).
On Wednesday, two ballistic missiles were launched from the Sunan area of Pyongyang into the Sea of Japan, according to the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff.
The missile tests come three days after a previous SRBM test and a day before U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris is scheduled to visit South Korea.
At the same time, the U.S. and South Korean navies are wrapping up a four-day exercise in the Sea of Japan. The training, involving a U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier for the first time since 2017, is slated to conclude on Thursday.
Meanwhile, South Korean intelligence told lawmakers on Wednesday that North Korea has completed preparations at the Punggye-ri test tunnel for its first nuclear test since 2017, reported Reuters. Analysts estimated that the test could take place between Oct. 16 and Nov. 7.


Poland—New Gas Pipeline With Norway Inaugurated
Baltic News Network | 09/28/2022
Denmark, Norway and Poland have inaugurated a new gas pipeline that will help reduce European dependence on Russian energy, reports the Baltic News Network.
On Tuesday, the Baltic Pipe was formally launched in a ceremony in Goleniow, Poland.
The new pipeline will support the export of 10 billion cubic meters of gas from Norway to Poland, with 3 billion cubic meters to be transported northwest to Denmark.
European Energy Commissioner Kadri Simson said that pipeline was "a key project for the security of supply of the region and the result of an E.U. policy drive to diversify sources of gas" and would play a key role in mitigating the ongoing energy crisis.


Senegal—2nd OPV Launched At French Shipyard
Defence Web | 09/28/2022
The second of three offshore patrol vessels ordered for the Senegalese navy has been launched at a French shipyard, reports Defence Web (South Africa).
Piriou launched the Niani at its shipyard in Concarneau on Sept. 12, the news site said on Tuesday.
Senegal ordered three OPV 58S patrol vessels from Piriou in 2019. The first, Walo, was launched five months ago and is fitting out ahead of sea trials. The final ship is fitting out in preparation for launch, according to the shipbuilder.
Deliveries are scheduled to begin in 2023, with all three to be handed over by mid-2024.
The Senegalese version of the OPV 58S is 203-feet  (62-m) long and  31 feet (9.5 m) in beam with a draft of 9.5 feet (2.9 m).
Armament is expected to consist of four Marte Mk 2/N anti-ship missiles; SIMBAD-RC air defense system; 76-mm main gun; and possibly two 20-mm NARWHAL remotely operated cannons. Naval Group is supplying its POLARIS combat management system.



_______________________________________________
Thelist mailing list -- thelist@list-to.us
To unsubscribe send an email to thelist-leave@list-to.us

TheList 6234

The List 6234     TGB To All, Good Sunday morning October 2.. Regards, skip Today in Naval and Marine Corps History October 2 Toda...